Why should you grow your own herbs? They are low maintenence and great to start gardening with Don’t need as much soil or space and will grow to the size of the space they are planted in They taste WAY better than store bought

Why should you grow your own herbs? They are low maintenance and great to start gardening with Don’t need as much soil or space and will grow to the size of the space they are planted in They taste WAY better than store-bought

Rosemary, Mint, Thyme, Oregano, Sage, Lavender This family likes slightly dryer conditions, so be careful not to over water. They also have shallow root systems. Cilantro, Cumin, Dill, Fennel Parsley This family prefers moist conditions and cooler weather. Their root system can be up to or more than a foot. Chives, Onion, Leek, Shallots

Rosemary, Mint, Thyme, Oregano, Sage, Lavender This family likes slightly dryer conditions, so be careful not to over water. They also have shallow root systems. Cilantro, Cumin, Dill, Fennel Parsley This family prefers moist conditions and cooler weather. Their root system can be up to or more than a foot. Chives, Onion, Leek, Shallots

Companion Planting Chives: Improves the flavor of carrots and tomatoes. A companion plant for Brassicas. Helps to repel aphids, carrot rust fly and Japanese beetles. Avoid planting near beans and peas. Dill: Dill improves the health of cabbages and other Brassicas, and is a very good companion for corn, cucumbers, lettuce and onions. Dill attracts the predatory wasps that feed on garden caterpillars, and it repels aphids and spider mites. Avoid planting near carrots and tomatoes. Parsley: Parsley like asparagus, carrots, chives, corn, onions and tomatoes. The leaves can be sprinkled on asparagus to repel asparagus beetles, and around roses, to improve their scent. Parsley allowed to bloom will attract hoverflies and predatory wasps. Don’t plant near mint. Rosemary: Rosemary is a good companion for beans, Brassicas, and carrots. Sage: Sage repels both the cabbage moth and the carrot rust fly, so it’s a great all around companion plant in the vegetable garden. Do not however, plant it near cucumbers, which are sensitive to aromatic herbs. Thyme: An all around beneficial plant for the garden, thyme is particularly worth planting near Brassicas, as it repels cabbage moths, and strawberries, as it enhances flavor. Cilantro: Repels aphids, potato beetles, and spider mites. Basil: Will improve vigor and flavor of tomatoes when planted side-by-side. Also good with asparagus, oregano, and peppers. Basil helps repel flies, mosquitoes and thrips. Oregano and Marjoram: Particularly good for repelling cabbage moths, and it can be planted between rows of Brassicas for this purpose. Also good around asparagus and basil.

Companion Planting Chives: Improves the flavor of carrots and tomatoes. A companion plant for Brassicas. Helps to repel aphids, carrot rust fly and Japanese beetles. Avoid planting near beans and peas. Dill: Dill improves the health of cabbages and other Brassicas, and is a very good companion for corn, cucumbers, lettuce and onions. Dill attracts the predatory wasps that feed on garden caterpillars, and it repels aphids and spider mites. Avoid planting near carrots and tomatoes. Parsley: Parsley like asparagus, carrots, chives, corn, onions and tomatoes. The leaves can be sprinkled on asparagus to repel asparagus beetles, and around roses, to improve their scent. Parsley allowed to bloom will attract hoverflies and predatory wasps. Don’t plant near mint. Rosemary: Rosemary is a good companion for beans, Brassicas, and carrots. Sage: Sage repels both the cabbage moth and the carrot rust fly, so it’s a great all around companion plant in the vegetable garden. Do not however, plant it near cucumbers, which are sensitive to aromatic herbs. Thyme: An all around beneficial plant for the garden, thyme is particularly worth planting near Brassicas, as it repels cabbage moths, and strawberries, as it enhances flavor. Cilantro: Repels aphids, potato beetles, and spider mites. Basil: Will improve vigor and flavor of tomatoes when planted side-by-side. Also good with asparagus, oregano, and peppers. Basil helps repel flies, mosquitoes and thrips. Oregano and Marjoram: Particularly good for repelling cabbage moths, and it can be planted between rows of Brassicas for this purpose. Also good around asparagus and basil.

Lone Wolfs Mint: Mint attracts earthworms, hoverflies and predatory wasps, and repels cabbage moths, aphids and flea beetles. Mint is invasive, so it may be better to use cut mint as a mulch around Brassicas, or to restrain it in containers around the vegetable garden. Avoid planting near parsley. Fennel: Not a companion for any garden food plant, fennel will actually inhibit growth in bush beans, kohlrabi, tomatoes and others. Plant it, but keep it out of the veggie garden. Otherwise it is similar to dill in the beneficial insects it attracts, and it is an important food source for caterpillars of the swallowtail butterfly. Lemon Balm: Lemon balm, like mint spreads rapidly (becomes weedy) and can take over an herb bed. Growing plants in containers helps control this problem.

Lone Wolfs Mint: Mint attracts earthworms, hoverflies and predatory wasps, and repels cabbage moths, aphids and flea beetles. Mint is invasive, so it may be better to use cut mint as a mulch around Brassicas, or to restrain it in containers around the vegetable garden. Avoid planting near parsley. Fennel: Not a companion for any garden food plant, fennel will actually inhibit growth in bush beans, kohlrabi, tomatoes and others. Plant it, but keep it out of the veggie garden. Otherwise it is similar to dill in the beneficial insects it attracts, and it is an important food source for caterpillars of the swallowtail butterfly. Lemon Balm: Lemon balm, like mint spreads rapidly (becomes weedy) and can take over an herb bed. Growing plants in containers helps control this problem.

Harvesting Herbs It's important to regularly prune the outer and lower leaves of your herb plants to encourage more leaf production (and to have delicious leaves to take indoors and eat). Harvesting often also helps prevent pest pressure and deters disease. It's a win all around. When harvesting, always start by cutting from the outermost branches and then work your way in. The one exception is basil, which will be harvested a little differently to help it bush out more.

Harvesting Herbs It’s important to regularly prune the outer and lower leaves of your herb plants to encourage more leaf production (and to have delicious leaves to take indoors and eat). Harvesting often also helps prevent pest pressure and deters disease. It’s a win all around. When harvesting, always start by cutting from the outermost branches and then work your way in. The one exception is basil, which will be harvested a little differently to help it bush out more.

Cut leafy herbs for drying early in the day. Oil content is highest at this time. Leafy herbs are ready from the time flower buds begin to form until the flowers are half open (exception; parsley can be cut any time, sage and tarragon cut early in the summer). Don’t cut perennial herbs back more than one third. Annual herbs may be cut 2 and 3 crops for drying during summer. Don’t cut perennial herbs after September or new growth won’t have a chance to mature before cold weather. Leafy herbs: Tie woody- stemmed herbs in small bundles, hang upside down – dry in a dark room to preserve colour, good air circulation and warm temperature. Your herbs will be crumbly dry in a few days to a week – store in an airtight container. Seed herbs: The seeds are ready when they turn brown, dry the seeds in the sun for several days – separate chaff from seed, continue to dry in the sun for another 1 ½ weeks – store in an airtight container.

Cut leafy herbs for drying early in the day. Oil content is highest at this time. Leafy herbs are ready from the time flower buds begin to form until the flowers are half open (exception; parsley can be cut any time, sage and tarragon cut early in the summer). Don’t cut perennial herbs back more than one third. Annual herbs may be cut 2 and 3 crops for drying during summer. Don’t cut perennial herbs after September or new growth won’t have a chance to mature before cold weather. Leafy herbs: Tie woody- stemmed herbs in small bundles, hang upside down – dry in a dark room to preserve colour, good air circulation and warm temperature. Your herbs will be crumbly dry in a few days to a week – store in an airtight container. Seed herbs: The seeds are ready when they turn brown, dry the seeds in the sun for several days – separate chaff from seed, continue to dry in the sun for another 1 ½ weeks – store in an airtight container.